Last edited by Nikozil
Saturday, February 8, 2020 | History

12 edition of Lipstick Jihad found in the catalog.

Lipstick Jihad

A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America and American in Iran

by Azadeh Moaveni

  • 33 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by PublicAffairs .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Asian / Middle Eastern history: postwar, from c 1945 -,
  • Social conditions,
  • Iranian Americans,
  • Elements In The U.S. Population,
  • Sociology - General,
  • Social Situations And Conditions,
  • Minority Studies - Ethnic American,
  • Biography & Autobiography,
  • Biography / Autobiography,
  • Iranian American women,
  • Biography/Autobiography,
  • Women,
  • Iran,
  • Ethnic Cultures - General,
  • Middle East - Iran,
  • Biography,
  • Moaveni, Azadeh,,
  • Ethnic Studies - General,
  • 1976-,
  • 1997-

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages249
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8820583M
    ISBN 101586481932
    ISBN 109781586481933

    This was extremely effective. Raised in California, she is the child of Iranian exiles. Learn about membership optionsor view our freely available titles. Outside, she was a California girl who practiced yoga and listened to Madonna.

    I Lipstick Jihad book struck with a very intense I-want-more-of-this feeling when I began reading Iranian American literature. Moaveni's homecoming falls in the heady days of the country's reform movement, when young people demonstrated in the streets and shouted for the Islamic regime to end. The landscape of her Tehran -- ski slopes, fashion shows, malls and cafes -- is populated by a cast of young people whose exuberance and despair brings the modern reality of Iran to vivid life. I utilize these memoirs to introduce students to Iranian culture and the experiences of Iranian American immigrants in the U. Happily, Lipstick Jihad exceeded my expectations, and I can enthusiastically recommend the book to just about anyone.

    I utilize these memoirs to introduce students to Iranian culture and the experiences of Iranian American immigrants in the U. I even took my laptop to family lunches, where relatives looked at me pityingly Lipstick Jihad book remarked that American journalism was really a form of indentured servitude. You must be logged into Bookshare to access this title. It ended up being a semi-emancipation, but promiscuity and drugs and all those things grew and festered after the revolution. Yet somehow, it wasn't until Lipstick Jihad that I realized how that was affecting my view of the country and the people. What I didn't really think about in an overall way until this book, was that it is not just any Iranian woman who gets to write books.


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Lipstick Jihad by Azadeh Moaveni Download PDF Ebook

AM: Definitely in Iran. So our daughters get educated, but are we ready for them to go off and be independent and have jobs?

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Does humor make the issues too easy for readers to ignore? AM: I think this young generation in Iran wants Western-style rights.

Lipstick Jihad book typed up my handwritten notes, printed Lipstick Jihad book out, and filed them with pretty page markers. I think evasiveness took on a whole new meaning after the revolution. She presents her own struggles and those of other Iranians alongside the privileges that many of them experience, whether based on age, gender, class, nationality, or employment.

Yet somehow, it wasn't until Lipstick Jihad that I realized how that was affecting my view of the country and the people. This is clearly not a relationship to be taken a face value.

She portrays Iran as a country that Lipstick Jihad book adores and fears America and has a deeply rooted sense of its own historical and regional importance. The landscape of her Tehran-ski slopes, fashion shows, malls and cafes-is populated by a cast of young people whose exuberance and despair brings the Lipstick Jihad book reality of Iran to vivid life.

Moving from the sermon to the captivity narrative to the autobiography to the speech to the slave narrative to the personal essay to the memoir, I wanted students to see the stark differences and overlapping formulas present in non-fiction Lipstick Jihad book.

Do I talk to everyone all over a city or spend a day in a village understanding how big picture questions have changed one place? As she leads us through the drug-soaked, underground parties of Tehran, into the hedonistic lives of young people desperate for change, Moaveni paints a rare portrait of Iran's rebellious next generation.

This was extremely effective. The contents of those chapters, however, are not lighthearted. Distrustful of each other's intentions yet longing at some level to reconcile, neither Tehran nor Washington know how this story will end.

As Moaveni becomes more accustomed to Iran, she sees how fundamental changes are coming from the bottom up, rather than top down, and that Iran has some potential for change. Moaveni's homecoming falls in the heady days of the country's reform movement, when young people demonstrated in the streets and shouted for the Islamic regime to end.

AM: I have a chapter on relationships and sexuality and how some women actually had their opportunities expanded by the revolution. Read a sample Book Summary A young Iranian-American journalist returns to Tehran and discovers not only the oppressive and decadent life of her Iranian counterparts who have grown up since the revolution, but the pain of searching for a homeland that may not exist.

Learn about membership optionsor view our freely available titles. Moaveni just published a second memoir, Honeymoon in Tehranwhich I am definitely going to buy, probably even in hardcover, because I enjoyed Jipstick Jihad so much.Being in the employ of Western media only adds to her torn dual identities of Iranian and American.I first read ¿Lipstick Jihad¿ shortly after it was released in and just recently reread it in preparation for Moaveni¿s second book ¿Honeymoon in Tehran.¿/5.

Download Lipstick Jihad eBook in PDF, EPUB, Mobi. Lipstick Jihad also available for Read Online in Mobile and Kindle.

LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for booklovers. All about Lipstick Jihad: A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America and American in Iran by Azadeh Moaveni. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for booklovers/5(16).Lipstick Jihad by Azadeb MoaveniAge: AdultGenre: MemoirSource: My copyPublisher: Public Affairs, ISBN: / pdf this pdf at your local libraryAzadeh Moaveni was born and raised in San Jose, CA into an Iranian culture that felt forced to leave Iran after the revolution.

Growing up Iranian in the US came with its awkward.Azadeh Moaveni is the author of Lipstick Jihad and the co-author, with Nobel Peace Prize laureate Shirin Ebadi, of Iran Awakening. She has lived and reported throughout the Middle East, and speaks both Farsi and Arabic fluently. As one of More about Azadeh Moaveni.Reviews ebook Lipstick Jihad “Lipstick Jihad is as hip as the promise of its title, insightful, smart and often profoundly moving Moaveni writes stunningly well.” Chicago Tribune “Moaveni has a journalist's eye for struggle and a memoirist's knack for finding meaning in her own internal conflicts.” Washington Post Book .